Category Archives: Arts & Culture

Cultural conundrums and dual fluidity by Tahmina Begum

by Tahmina Begum

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The young, bright and awesome talent Tahmina Begum talks to us about cultural duality and being caught between preconceived identities. Tahmina is a writer and the CEO and Editor-in-Chief of  XXY Magazine, an agender culture, fashion and art magazine and social platform for young emerging creatives, focused on innovation and collaboration.

‘The Chat’

The other day, I was sat down for “the chat”. Not the sex chat, as I’m hoping by the simple notion of being twenty-one, that my mother and I do not need to relive the conversation that never happened, but the one where I was reminded of where I was “from”.… Read more...

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Interview With Artist And Illustrator Andrea Pippins

by Rose Miyonga

Andrea Pippins is an artist, illustrator and designer from Washington, D. C., whose work seeks to inspire a generation of women. Her first book, I Love My Hair is a colouring book that invites people of all ages and colours to celebrate their hair for its unique beauty. Her second book, Becoming Me, is a glorious exploration of what it means to be a young woman of colour. It asks us to doodle, scribble and write our own investigation into ourselves.

I spoke to her about beauty, creative arts, and the importance of self-expression.

becomingme1_1000Tell us a little about your upbringing.

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Thandie interviews Director Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy

 

p12519092_p_v8_aaWhen we first started ThandieKay, we were very aware of using the concept of beauty to explore a far wider canvas than our faces. That is why one of our very first posts on this platform was on Pakistani filmmaker, activist, and double Oscar-winner Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy. Amidst our front page with lovely interviews and ‘tips on beauty’,  was a post on Sharmeen’s powerful documentary ‘Saving Face’ which focused on the horrendous acid attacks on women in Pakistan for which Sharmeen earned her first Academy Award. It spoke to many themes that we are passionate about; education for women, a supportive community free of ‘shame’, aid for the marginalised voices and the acknowledgment of the damage that toxic masculinity can manifest.… Read more...

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Are You Waiting for It to Be Me? A Meditation on White Silence by Funa Maduka

Are you waiting for it to be me? Funa Maduka thandiekay.com

I ask because I sit stunned by your silence. And now, I am so overwhelmed by yours that I feel the need to break mine.

Do you think that a police officer will take the time to get to know me? That he will take the time to know of my prep school education and Ivy League degrees? That he’ll let me tell him that the first CD we danced to together was Alanis Morissette’s Jagged Little Pill? That we’ve vacationed with your family in New England, laughed over high tea in London, traded secrets in French…that I can actually tolerate a couple country songs?… Read more...

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Orange Culture: How Nigerians do Gender Fluid

By Oyin Akande

‘Gender fluidity’ has become the hot topic of 2016. High street brand Zara released its interpretation of agender clothing earlier this year. Designer labels like Casely-Hayford, Rick Owens and Maison Margiela have sent models down the runway and straight into a conversation around neutrality. The conversation existed before this year but as Mrs. Prada surmised  “more and more, it feels instinctively right to translate the same idea for both genders.” It is part of the contemporary movement towards recognising diverse identities and interrogating the precepts we have for feminine and masculine identity.

Women have embraced gender fluidity with some ease as we’ve been wearing men’s clothes for decades anyway.Read more...

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“Woman”: Feminist Anthem by Songwriter Diana Gordon

by Oyin Akande

screen-shot-2016-12-12-at-04-24-10Do you remember when Beyonce dropped Lemonade, the frenzy-inspiring visual album that incited a modern witch-hunt and a worldwide Internet debate over the fictitious “Becky with the good hair”? Well, the femme fatale songwriter behind the lyrics from “Sorry”, as well as “Don’t Hurt Yourself” and “Daddy Issues”, Diana Gordon, has recently topped her efforts and this time it is her voice singing her words. Gordon has been working in the music industry for years, producing and writing songs for several artists- such as Mary J. Blige, Jennifer Lopez and Ciara– and performing in dance clubs.… Read more...

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Introducing SHE. Creates

By Oyin Akande

 

I was fortunate to meet the most astonishing and brilliant women recently and to get involved with a truly amazing charity project called SHE. Creates

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SHE. Creates is a not-for-profit organization that seeks to improve the lives of women by nurturing their creative talents. This is about engaging young women in art and design precisely in regions were both arts education is undervalued and there is a palpable need for infrastructure to support and empower women. While arts education is nascent in many centres of the Western world, the deficit is still noticeable in many developing countries.… Read more...

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Occupying Space: V&A gal-dem takeover

By Oyin Akande

On Friday 28th October 2016, the print and online magazine representing and represented by women of colour, gal-dem celebrated the launch of the gal-hood issue, its first print publication by occupying the traditional space of the Victoria and Albert Museum. The V&A hosts a Friday Late where the museum extends its public opening hours until 22.00 on every last Friday of the month. Last week, however, was perhaps the first time that the 160+ year old institution was celebrated beautiful female diversity in this way.

It was a striking clash of fossilised artefacts with active, energetic voices; of a hegemonic establishment with non-normative, progressive feminism.… Read more...

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My Motherland, My Zimbabwe by Rutendo Wazara

When Kay and Thandie first asked me to write about Zimbabwe, I was excited, proud even, to share my love for my country and my people. Though my excitement soon turned to dread as I thought, “how can I do justice to a country that I had not lived in for fifteen years?”. 

Similarly to Thandie, my father’s job took our family away from Zimbabwe when I was young. We lived in Botswana, Nigeria and eventually settled in South Africa. I have lived most of my life outside of Zimbabwe yet have never felt that Zimbabwe was too far from me.… Read more...

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Identity and the archetypal myth of Ophelia by Patricia Ekall

Patricia Ekall is a freelance journalist, editor and blogger based in Bristol, U.K.  She has “shameless curiosity”, is an enthusiastic storyteller and spends the majority of her time contributing to print and digital publications. Welcome to ThandieKay Patricia!

I think about identity a lot.

The word itself implies strength. The notion of an ‘assured sense of self’ is after all an attractive one.

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A young Patricia Ekall

However, for all of it’s clearly defined allure, I think identity, and identifying, can also make a person vulnerable. I’ve come to see how the confusion, curiosity and subsequent projections of others can affect our view of ourselves.… Read more...

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