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Interview: ‘Typical Girls’ Founder Jamila Prowse

TG Team

The Typical Girls team. From left to right, Chani Wisdom, Jamila Prowse and Celiya Koster.

by Rose Miyonga and Jamila Prowse 

Typical Girls is part of a growing movement of zines by and for a diversity of women who aren’t interested in waiting to be given a voice by the mainstream media.
It is a space for self-expression and sharing of the female experience, which ultimately demonstrates that there is no one way to be a self-identifying woman.
It launched in 2015 with an issue entitled ‘Beginnings’, and ‘The Naked Issue’ was released last year, the Girls are back with volume three, ‘Generations’ this month. This issue invites readers and contributors to explore the many facets of their identities and what defines our generation, looking at the activists and creatives rebelling against the many frustrations of today’s society and political climate.
I wish that zines like Typical Girls had existed when I was a young teenager, thumbing the pages of glossy magazines searching in vain for something that reflected or honoured my experience, and I am sure that the next generation of Girls will be better off for having access to such a plurality of talent and self-expression.
We spoke to Jamila Prowse, co-founder of Typical Girls (and ThandieKay Features Editor) about her vision for the future of the zine, and about where it all began.

What is Typical Girls? Where did it come from?

Typical Girls is an intersectional women’s magazine. When it was established at the end of 2015 it was to create an inclusive space: one where self-identifying women from a variety of backgrounds, ages, cultures and disciplines could come together under one roof. In this way it was established as a response, an alternative to women’s publishing as it stood at the time. We wanted to genuinely represent our contributors, in a way that was honest to them, and avoided tokenising.

When I speak about the catalyst behind establishing the magazine, I often return to my childhood. I grew up in a predominantly white middle class community and was raised in a single parent household by a white mother. Despite having a mixed heritage (my dad was black South African) I did not have access to my black heritage growing up. As such, I didn’t strongly identify with my blackness. Yet, being noticeably ‘other’ in my appearance, compared to those around me, I also experienced a strong sense of alienation in my formative years which lasted well into my 20s, and still follows me today.

Chani and Jamila for i-D Spring 2016, shot by Jack Davidson

I always loved magazines as a teenager. The glossy pages seemed to hold secrets into another world. I would tear those pages out and paste them all over my wall, staring at them longingly, and hoping that their magic would somehow seep off the page and into my own life. I was overly romantic, and aching for something of importance to happen to me. I tried to imagine myself in those pages, in those worlds, but I could never quite make the leap of imagination to align myself with them. None of the girls in those pages had hair or features like my own. I would spend hours in the bath smoothing down my afro hair, willing it to stay straight. As much as I hoped and wished that the pastel colours of my favourite publications would influence my own life, I knew deep down that I did not belong in that world, because nothing had ever shown me otherwise.

It’s infuriating that, up until recently, you had to scour popular culture to find black faces reflected back. The few examples of black representation we had were nothing more than homogenised stereotypes. You would struggle, too, to find any discussions or explorations of mixed heritage. As a young teenager I was convinced that there was no one else who felt remotely the same to me.

TG was established in order to ensure that young women of colour could see themselves mirrored in the pages of a magazine. If young people don’t see themselves reflected in the world around them, how will they view themselves as being a part of it? Thankfully, with increasing discussions around representation things are starting to change. Women’s publishing is no longer the whitewashed space that it once was. Instead of responding to a lack, we are now part of a wider dialogue. I am so pleased to be able to provide a platform which contributes in some way to that conversation. If we can create a movement in women’s publishing which truly reflects all women, than we will have achieved something.

Cover

Gabrielle Richardson on the cover of Vol. 3, shot by Amarachi Nwosu

What’s the process of going from idea to holding the magazine in your hands?

We have an extremely tiny editorial team who put together TG. It is made up of myself, our Art Director Chani Wisdom, and our newest Editor Celiya Koster. Initially, after deciding on a theme, we put a call out for submissions. Then the three of us go and source content based around this. Our contributors are the ones who really form the publication. We get sent such incredible work, and people give so much of their time and energy to our little publication. We wouldn’t exist without them.

For issue 3, visual artist, writer and creative consultant Amarachi Nwosu came to us to pitch the cover story. Amarachi assembled an incredible team in New York, and took to the streets of Brooklyn with our cover star Gabrielle Richardson. Gabrielle is a curator of the Art Hoe Collective, an online platform which showcases the work of PoC. Gabrielle is at the forefront of a movement of creatives who are shaping the future of representation. She is facilitating the voices of young people, Amarachi recognised that instantly, as well as the fact that Gabrielle’s ethos is entirely aligned with our own. The vision and dedication of the team behind that shoot brought a real magic to our third issue. You can feel the life jumping out of the pages when you look through it.

Once all the content is together, it’s just down to Chani and her laptop. Months of graft and painstaking work from Chani gives the publication a real sense of self. She puts great care into all the minute details of the design, hiding little nuances that tie the entire feel of the magazine together. That sense of coherence you get as you turn from page to page is all down to her.

Jamila interviewing Hollie Cook for issue 3

You’re doing something new with the magazine, but that at the same time reflects a long history of feminism in print. Who/what were your influences?

We take our namesake from The Slits song ‘Typical Girls’ (we’re always overjoyed when readers pick up on this detail). For us, their no bullshit attitude, and complete control over the work they were putting out, is a real inspiration. They went out on stage and acted in a way that society wasn’t used to. Here were three women who stood on the cover of an album, stark naked and covered in mud. In terms of subverting the male gaze that was revolutionary. It was so rare for women to stand in the nude, in a way that wasn’t sexualised or produced for a man. The Slits showed that you could be a woman and still be strong, independent, and not take shit from anyone.

In our third issue we got the chance to speak to Hollie Cook, who was part of the second generation of The Slits. Hollie’s first experience of touring was with The Slits. She spent many of her formative years under their wing. It was amazing to hear firsthand how the band shaped the musician, and woman, Hollie is today. You can really feel that their resonance withstands multiple generations. I’m sure it’s something that will continue to be passed on by Hollie, who in her own way refuses to make any compromises on her vision.

Nakeya Brown’s ‘The Edge of a Dream’ featured in issue 3.

In terms of publishing, there are of course DIY zines. In our ethos we’re very much aligned with the idea that if you don’t see yourself being represented, you go and create something that does. Spare Rib, which was a second-wave feminist magazine, immediately comes to mind. But then, in that, I think it is necessary to acknowledge that feminism has not always been an inclusive space. In fact, many people, especially women of colour, trans women and sex workers, still feel alienated from the movement. It’s about trying to create something that is truly inclusive. Inclusivity is not instantly achievable, and as editors we are constantly challenged to work at it. We might not ever get the formula completely right, but with each new issue we can ask ourselves how we can be more open.

i-D, too, has always stood aside from the crowd. Whereas tokenising, and a lack of visibility, have been inherent problems within publishing, i-D has never adhered to this. The first person of colour to feature on the cover was as early as April 1983, when the Nigerian-born singer Sade graced the fourteenth issue. In issue 3 we got to speak to Lynette Nylander, the writer, editor and creative consultant who worked as Deputy Editor of i-D for 3 years, about how the publication shaped her experience of growing up as a young black girl in London. i-D made it possible for women like Lynette, and the editorial team behind TG, to realise that we could be a part of shaping the culture around us.

Today, publications like Riposte, Sister Magazine, OOMK, Orlando and Girls Club push us to be better. I love that so many independent publications are now going out and shaping the landscape of publishing to be a space of resistance.

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TG’s art director Chani Wisdom, with a copy of issue 3 at Magazine Brighton.

Typical Girls is part of a movement of zines with a fresh take on art and society. Why do you think people are interested in reading more socially conscious content today?

It’s tricky growing up in a world which is so centred on technology. It is something we are all acutely aware of but it’s actually terrifying. Information is so fast paced and easily digestible that we don’t really need to take the time to sit back and think anymore. We’re told what to read, what to like, what to follow. I was part of the generation that spent the first decade of our lives largely offline. I didn’t have a smart phone until I was about 17, and didn’t have Facebook until my mid teens. I find it really concerning that young people are now being raised entirely on social media. There’s no escape from it. It penetrates every aspect of your life.

With that, how we consume our news has altered considerably. The rise of clickbait journalism and fake news has taken away the core of what we’re reading. I think people are increasingly realising this, and making a conscious decision to seek out platforms which provide honest, captivating, thought-out content. We take our time when producing TG. The 6 months between each issue prevents a fast pace of consumption.

In look and feel, TG is closer to a book than a magazine. It’s a really weighty publication (quite literally – it’s a heavy bugger). It asks you to take your time over it. Pour yourself a cup of tea and sit down in your favourite armchair. When people have a copy stored on their bookshelf, I always feel like that’s exactly where it should be. You could easily spend months perusing slowly through the pages. It’s not about being up to date with the latest fashion or news; it’s about slow journalism, which might be somewhat outdated by the time you get to it, but is more about the timeless value of people’s stories and experiences.

What can we expect in Vol. 3?

As we have grown and developed, so too has the breadth of the work on our pages. Issue 3, which is our biggest issue yet, is filled with life and colour. It is an offering, a love note, to all the incredible women who inspire us on a day to day basis. TG allows us to explore the many aspects that can, and do, encompass womanhood. It is our way of proving that there is no such thing as a ‘typical’ girl.

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Garbielle Richardson in issue 3, shot by Amarachi Nwosu

How do you think small publications can survive and thrive in the technology-dominated instant-gratification society? How can we make space for zines like Typical Girls to get the respect they deserve?

I think it’s about putting your money where your mouth is (as blunt as that may sound). We have a lot of power as consumers. If we invest our time, energy and interests, as well as our spare pennies, into publications and artists we believe in, they will be able to continue. If we demand, as consumers, that journalism is considered, and conscious, then publications will eventually have to listen.

The reality of publishing is that it’s a pricey industry. Funds that come in are quickly eaten by printing costs, and all the expenses that come along with running a small business. In order for independent publications to survive, they need to have readers who are invested in their livelihood. None of the people I know who run small print magazines make any money. They do it out of the necessity to contribute something worthwhile to the industry. Everyone involved tends to have full-time jobs on the side just to keep it going. We put our own money into TG, and don’t earn a cent. Our contributors, too, give their time for free out of a love of the publication. But it’s not an ideal situation by any standard. For creatives, making work is often the determinant of their livelihoods. It’s how they put food on the table.

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Jamila with Vol. 1

We need to shift how we view the creative industries entirely, especially people who work outside of a commercial, corporate agenda. In today’s political climate there is little financial support available for independent artists. If we can consciously change how we, as consumers, spend money — buy an artist’s print instead of a wall hanging from a high street store — we can make small changes that have the potential to really impact someone’s life. The same goes for if you have a choice between a publication heavily filled with advertising, where 70% of the publication is marketing, and one that is independently run.

And Typical Girls in the future?

The aim in the future is to continue to grow and develop with the times. Hopefully collaborating more with publications we admire, and continuing to work to create a cohesive and supportive movement of independent publishing. We have lots of exciting new projects in the pipeline for the next year, to really push what defines TG as a publication, so watch this space…

Typical Girls Vol. 3, ‘Generations’ is available to order here.
You can follow them on Instagram and Twitter
Cover Credits:
Photography: Amarachi Nwosu
Producer: Michael Rotimi
Hairstylist: Kessia Randolph
Photo assistant: Nikko Gary

A/W 2017 Fashion Edit by Naomi Shimada

NaomiPosted by Kay

Called the best thing on instagram by Refinery 29, body positive activist, model and nascent documentary maker Naomi Shimada is a warm ray of  sunshine in our cynical times.

Rarely seen without a brightly coloured outfit, a huge smile, and a great pair of kicks, half Japanese, raised-in-Spain Naomi is one of a kind and I adore her.

N.Y.

Collina Strada

Hilary Taymour is a friend and she’s the designer behind Collina Strada.  Hilary started her casting process by deliberately selecting models from countries on Trump’s ‘travel ban’ list. However that proved harder than it from there we started selecting a wide range of models with different ethnic backgrounds, beliefs, ideologies that are fearful of the consequences during this presidential term. “We wanted to cast humans who are fearful of what is next: homosexual models; pro-choice models; a model in need of healthcare long-term illness.” Her casting made me feel so many things. Politics and fashion can be an uncomfortable and inappropriate mix, but for me, this show presented clothes via politics from a real-life sense, and more like social commentary.

Screen Shot 2017-03-13 at 1.57.12 PMCollina Strada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ThandieKay A/W 2017 Fashion Edit

London

Ashish

Ashish is alway hands down my favourite London show. Political fashion shows are obviously trending right now but Ashish’s shows have always been political, with so much heart and soul radiating through in all that glitters. His show has an authenticity that reigns over all the others.

His t-shirts were emblazoned with the slogans ‘You are much lovelier than you think’, ‘Fall in love and be more tender’ – all good reminders of what we need to be saying to each other, doing, loving, caring hugging etc! Now that other designers like Dior and Prabal are trying to jump on this bandwagon Ashish reminds them how it’s done. That this isn’t a fad – it’s a lifestyle!!! That it’s cool to care, it always has been and always will be.

Their collaboration with the US Baseball league challenged the hyper male world with rainbows and sequins! Ashish’s show castings have always been the most inclusive and diverse – this time starred some of my favourite angels Wilson Oryema and and Leomie Andersen. The models wore Mexican Lucha ‘fighter make-up’ by Issamaya French with each model wearing their own gorgeous individual designs!

Ashish A/W 2017Ashish A/W 2017

 

Paris

Comme Des Garcons

Hurrah for Comme! It’s just so funny and I don’t even know if it means to be! The so-called ‘ready to wear’ Comme Des Garcons collection is never dull and this season Rei really turned it on. Instead of following

 Paris

Comme Des Garcons

Hurrah for Comme! It’s just so funny and I don’t even know if it means to be! The so-called ‘ready to wear’ Comme Des Garcons collection is never dull and this season Rei really turned it on. Instead of following fashion’s fascination with everything skinny, Rei Kawakubo does what Rei

Paris

Comme Des Garcons

Hurrah for Comme! It’s just so funny and I don’t even know if it means to be! The so-called ‘ready to wear’ Comme Des Garcons collection is never dull and this season Rei really turned it on. Instead of following fashion’s fascination with everything skinny, Rei Kawakubo does what Rei wants and created what she calls the ‘future silhouette’, padded, in your face, bulbous spherical Picasso-esque curves all coming at you, impossible to ignore! These outfits are a total reflection of what we need in these tumultuous times: a protective suit to hide in with trainers to run as fast as you can when need be! Your very own impenetrable fort! Obsessed with the Nike fly-knit collaboration, a white sneaker with a little bow – perfect for a girl like me who loves a glam but comfy look and avoids heels like the plague! NEED these looks to roll down the Kingsland Road and make people smile again!

Comme Des Garcons A/W 2017Comme Des Garcons A/W 2017

    

 

                                                                   

Milan

Gucci

I almost didn’t want to pick Gucci cause it’s the obvious choice but Alessandro Michele is an absolute genius. This show was so jam-packed with every kind of fun outfit on the planet my eyes were popping out of my head! I’m completely over stimulated! Candy for the eyes!

Gucci A/W 2017Gucci A/W 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That’s all fashion folks!

Follow Naomi on Instagram and on Twitter

Naomi painted and photographed by Margot Bowman

Naomi painted and photographed by Margot Bowman

 

Women. Who. Wrap.

By Rose Miyonga

Lupita Nyong'OWith the prominence of smart, beautiful women of colour in the pubic eye wearing head wraps, it might seem like head wraps are having a renaissance. But i would argue that they never went away. Phenomenal women like Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Lupita Nyong’o and Zadie Smith deserve credit for wearing their head wraps with such style and grace, and their power is only enhanced by the fact that the history of the garment makes them part of a long tradition of women of African origin defying the conventions of Western beauty standards and standing tall and powerful at the intersection between tradition and avant-garde.

Head wraps are worn by women and men all over the world for various cultural, social and religious reasons, and the history of the head wrap in Africa is diverse.

The African American head wrap has a distinct story. At one time it was mandatory for slaves to cover their hair and, as photographer Juliana Kasumu discovered while working in her photo-series, Moussour to Tignon: The Evolution of the Head-Tie, head wraps were made compulsory for Black women, freed and enslaved in 1786 by Esteban Rodríguez Miró. The governor  of Louisiana and Florida decreed that black women, both freed and enslaved, had to wear a head wrap as a means of racial classification.

But like all policies intended to strip Black women of the natural power of their Afro hair throughout history have, it failed.

Kasumu notes: “They looked even more beautiful, and more appealing, and they used to decorate these head wraps with jewels, and plumes. They became more attractive if anything. It just backfired.”

For me, the head wrap is like a crown that gives height, power and presence. It connects me to a long legacy of Black women who refused to crush their beauty to make other people feel more comfortable. Sometimes it’s functional, like when I rub homemade leave-in conditioner into my hair and wrap it to let it soak in, but more often it’s because of how it makes me feel. It makes me stand tall, think hard and feel proud.

We asked some wonderful women who wrap (and one man, too), to reflect on what it means to them.

Bwalya Newton – Writer and Founder of Hackney Gazelles

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“Like all hairstyles for black women, headwraps mean a myriad of things to me. From protective style, to channelling Royal African Realness, emulating Erykah Badu, or even just feeling too lazy to do something with my hair, I find that it’s a look that gets to adapt and change with my mood and style. 

My Aunty Chipili was always in headwraps; different materials, different prints and always tied in new ways. I guess symbolically for me it was and still is her crown. A sense of pride exudes from black women who wear headwraps and they also emit a regal energy – I mean look at Nefertiti. 

Style inspo firstly comes from every single Igbo and Yoruba aunty heading off to a wedding or Sunday service in the most deluxe gele’s, their looks and fabrics are consistently immaculate. Also, I remember, as a kid my mum having a cassette of Miriam Makeba lying around and being enamoured by Miriam’s noble headwrap and dangly earrings on the cover art. Solange always has fun with it her looks and headwraps and Erykah Badu’s layering techniques are killer. I really love how Nina Simone’s wraps matched the fabrics of her designer suits and bespoke chic clothes. She’s a lasting symbol of opulence and unapologetic blackness. 

Last, but not least, Aunty Chipili, who like Nina, always wore whatever she wanted and paired it with an elegantly-tied headwrap.”

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Vernon Francois – Hair Stylist Extraordinaire 

lupita-3-c474c45b-477c-42a1-8cd2-772aba5032dd“The creative process for styling any of Lupita’s looks is always a joint effort between myself, Lupita and her stylist.  Like me, Lupita is always filled with ideas.  Her hair is so versatile and we both get excited talking about our visions and possibilities for it.  There must be a balance though, of fabulous hair that works with the overall styling; complementing what she is wearing, not distracting from it. 

For the Queen of Katwe promotional tour, premieres and so on, Lupita knew that she wanted to wear a head wrap.  We started thinking about this about a year in advance and researched sources from all over the world.  Our main influence which helped to inform our vision of what we wanted to achieve, was African tribes. 

Her stylist and I spent quite a long time in various markets and fabric stores in Kenya, sourcing materials.  We took these to the design houses that Lupita was working with, who then either used the same fabric for fashioning her dress or used it to inspire their own choice of fabric. 

Lupita had to explain to her fashion houses that we wouldn’t know exactly how her head wraps would look, until the day.  On the day of styling any head wrap, I always think that the most important thing is to approach it with a flexible mindset and be prepared to go with the flow.  Because each piece of material will bend, shape and fold in its own way.  Create with the material. 

Styling a head wrap in a modern way, for me, boils down to these three things: creating height, a striking silhouette and choosing the best fabric to either match or complement your outfit.

lupita-nyongo-headwraps-7Femininity, elegance and confidence.  You can’t help but walk with your head held high when wearing a wrap.  And it’s been shown that if you walk tall with a positive posture, you feel more confident.  Which I think can only be a good thing.

Of course, I am also highly aware that head wraps can have cultural and religious meaning; which I am always very respectful of.  I keep this in mind when working with my clients, choosing colours appropriate to events that they are attending, for instance.

Head wraps are worn by people all over the world; in many ways and for lots of different reasons; functional, fashionable, cultural or religious.  Those of African origin tend to vary in style depending on where they are created.

The Nigerian head wrap is called a gele and has inspired some of my creations for Lupita.  Geles are usually quite big and bold with lots of height.  I wanted to make sure that I did this head wrap justice with a blend of keeping its integrity but making it more modern.  I was pleased that this was recognised and embraced by a lot of people who are familiar with geles; and received some very positive comments about it.”

Leyla Hussein – Psychotherapist and Gender Rights Activist

leylahussein800-764x1024Head wraps are a part of who I am, part of my identity as an African women. I’m African first- you see me that’s what you notice first.  Head wraps also represent my fierce lioness side. I feel extremely powerful when wearing my head wrap, as a child most women who I admired,  including my mother, wore heard wraps.

I don’t wear it for political reasons or solidarity with others, all my life I fought for being my true authentic self and wearing a heard wrap is me at my core, however the head wraps has being a symbol to exhibit my African roots when speaking at a global stage, a symbol of pride. 

I love bold colours, such as red ,  green and egg yolk, I would wear it with my western clothing, love pairing heard warps with my fitted suits, you will find my head wrap colour will match my statement accessory wether it’s a necklace, rig or hand bag. 

My biggest style inspiration has always being my mother, as a child I couldn’t wait to grow up so I can dress like her, she always had her own sense of style till today my mother designs a lot of my  dresses, we have similar taste, we like simple and unique looks, I guess the head wrap gives me that opportunity to experiment with colours and print.”

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Follow Rose Miyonga on Twitter and Instagram

Introducing Esimbi!

By Rose Miyonga

If you’re a regular here, you’ll know how much we both love t-shirts, and the powerful use of the slogan! Rose Miyonga chatted with Congolese fashion designer Tina Lobondi to talk about the story behind her Esimbi T Shirts.

ESIMBI-THANDIENEWTON

1. When and where did ESIMBI begin? 

We organised the launch of ESIMBI in October 2015 at the venue Mallett in London Mayfair. I wanted to present the apprenticeship program but also introduce our partnership with local charities and schools to create awareness on the current educational  situation in Congo.

The event, which had a theme of Celebrating the future generation of Congo, was a great success with over 150 people in attendance, celebrities, high-net worth individuals and corporate businesses. Live DJ, Fashion show, Canapes, drinks and gifts from our sponsors were the delights of the evening.

2. What is your mission? 

ESIMBI is an initiative to promote the arts, fashion and culture of Congolese origin as well as promote education, apprenticeships and work for individuals of Congolese descent in both the UK and Congo, Kinshasa. 

3. Who or what inspires you? 

I am inspired by a few people and historical figures such as Kimpa Vita and Patrice Lumumba, the youth and being surrounded by strong women with incredible stories. They motivate me to do better in anything I undertake by creating opportunities for the youth.

4. Where does the name ESIMBI come from? 

ESIMBI means “it works” in Lingala, a language spoken in Congo.

I chose this name because I believe that this program has to work. It will benefit the whole nation to improve our education system.

5. Why are fashion and the arts important to you? 

Fashion and arts have always been my way of communicating my creativity. I used to write short stories, draw garments and take part in a lot of activities such as dancing. I grew up in a village where there was not much to do so I had to keep myself busy and learning new things was essential to me.

T&K in Garden 8006. What  projects are on the horizon? 

ESIMBI will be hosting in partnership with the university ISAM and Congo Fashion Institute, a conference about the different roles in the fashion industry on 17th October to an audience of over 200 students and individuals who have signed up for attendance.

We will then host our first Arts and Cultural day aimed to benefit, street children, orphans, local schools and young adults. We want to bring them together and provide a safe place where they can be free to be children. We will have an art competition, also taking place in Kinshasa led by Congolese artist Eddy Kamuanga and a panel of other mentors and judges to choose 5 winners amongst the children. 

We are fundraising at present to make sure we can purchase all the supplies in order to make this event successful.

Our annual fundraising event will take place on 24th November in London, UK.

7. What is your long-term vision for EMBISI? Where do you see it in 10 years? 

In 10 years, I hope ESIMBI would have made an impact in the education system in Kinshasa.  And our apprenticeship program will be a major force in creating new entrepreneurs and employment within the country. We would have empower the youth to believe in themselves and work hard to make things happen.

We will be running our programs and workshops in an office in Kinshasa and Education would finally be free of charge for young children and their families. This will create a stronger community.

The vision the rest of the world have for Congo would have changed to something positive.


8. How can we get involved?

It is important for us to spread the word and I am forever grateful to ThandieKay for the opportunity to do so with their readers.

You can be involved by purchasing the ESIMBI Tshirts. All profits will be used to assist with the school fees of children attending our partner schools, such as Malaika school for girls in Kalebuka and ONG Naomi, who brings education to children who are hospitalised.

Donations and your support are very important to our projects because we want all our workshops and activities to be complimentary to the children and their family. 

The first Tshirt is on sale here.

Follow ESIMBI on Twitter

Follow Tina on Twitter and Instagram

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Lui: Anais Mali’s Sexy

by Oyin Akande

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Nipples removed by instagram not us 🙂

So it’s hard to imagine a world-class model being told that she’s anything but gorgeous, right? While we are increasingly aware how many mainstream industries push rigid and unattainable ideas of beauty, we have a tendency to overlook that these constructs are even more ruthlessly observed for models than they are for us, the majority of ‘real women’.

French model Anaïs Mali has featured in many editions of Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar and many other international titles; she has walked down the runways for Michael Kors, Balenciaga, Jason Wu and more. It would seem to most that her success in the industry, at the very least, is a confirmation of her widely accepted perfection. Yet, after landing the cover of French magazine Lui, an adult entertainment title created by Daniel Filipacchi, Jacques Lanzmann and Frank Ténot, Mali posted this on Instagram:

“I always wanted to be a LUI cover girl!! I was told by my ex model agency 2 years ago, that I wasn’t sexy enough for The Magazine. So I wanted to thank first of all @nextmodelsparis  for making this happen and a huge thanks to LUI for giving me the opportunity to show y’all what I could do (I’m a pretty shy girl and don’t often pose nude) so this is HUGE for me ! I’ve been criticized by the industry for Yeaaaaaaars because of the way I looked (too skinny , too sexy , not sexy enough, too petite .. blabla). I’m so at ease now that I realized that sexy begins by loving yourself and not caring what others think (EVER). anais-maliDon’t ever let anyone tell you that you re not good enough for this or that ! If you think that you are .. well you are . If the other are too blind to see it, their loss … And this .. is me”

Anais is not your ‘typical’ pin up in that she is incredibly slender, but Lui magazine has a more ‘high fashion’ slant, using photographers who usually shoot for magazines such as W Magazine rather than Playboy.

Born to a mother from Chad and a Polish father, Anaïs belongs to a generation of gorgeous melaninated models working the fashion and beauty industries. But she’s been fighting the rigid ideals of her industry for a long time. She left France for New York when she was 18 as she found it difficult to get jobs. She was told ‘This is Paris; black girls don’t work here’ and in 2013 spoke out about the persistent lack of diversity on the runway particularly in Milan.15357055_10154364455633645_2146778666_n

No matter who you are, what you do or what you look like, society’s mechanism can attack your confidence by telling you there is something you lack. Your “imperfections” or simply just qualities you do not possess (because we cannot be all things all at once, right?) become the standard against which you measure your worth. And the female body and identity are historically the choice  ‘victims’ of these paradoxical pressures.

Defined by your curves, defined by your lack of them. We must all be mindful of the pressure to be something other than ourselves, and not let this eclipse who we are. Even if you are a model.anais-mali-allure-may-2015

 

The model recently launched, Anaïs a collection of bodysuits created by model v Mali and designer Urivaldo Lopes in 2016. Inspired by the audaciousness of studio 54 and the supermodel era, Anaïs reinvents a 1980’s wardrobe staple for the modern woman with a “Made in Italy” philosophy, creating and armor that empowers its wearer through an urban perspective and irrefutably bold aesthetic.


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